Category Archives: Election 2012

Joe Miklosi: Vows to hold fast to his desire to “serve the people”

State Rep. Joe Miklosi greets Richelle Hentemann and her daughter, Madison, 4, at a light-rail station near I-25 and Orchard Road in Greenwood Village. "He's a very diligent, earnest and driven individual," said former House Speaker Andrew Romanoff. (Andy Cross, The Denver Post)
State Rep. Joe Miklosi greets Richelle Hentemann and her daughter, Madison, 4, at a light-rail station near I-25 and Orchard Road in Greenwood Village. “He’s a very diligent, earnest and driven individual,” said former House Speaker Andrew Romanoff. (Andy Cross, The Denver Post)

Standing in a Greenwood Village brewery with his wife near his side, Democratic state Rep. Joe Miklosi announced he was running for Congress to restore job growth and the American dream.

“I’ve seen you raise your children; I’ve seen you work two jobs; I’ve seen you make sacrifices,” Miklosi told about 50 supporters.

That was July 2011 — several months before he went from being a long-shot Democrat vying for a seat in what was a Republican stronghold to a formidable challenger in what’s now one of the most competitive congressional contests in not only the state but also the nation.

Mike Coffman: Aurora roots “play to my strengths”

U.S. Rep. Mike Coffman, center, speaks with Andrew Shields as he makes spinner back-plate brackets during a visit to Univair Aircraft Corporation's headquarters in Aurora. Coffman is running for re-election in the 6th Congressional District. (Photos by AAron Ontiveroz, The Denver Post)
U.S. Rep. Mike Coffman, center, speaks with Andrew Shields as he makes spinner back-plate brackets during a visit to Univair Aircraft Corporation’s headquarters in Aurora. Coffman is running for re-election in the 6th Congressional District. (Photos by AAron Ontiveroz, The Denver Post)

To understand Congressman Mike Coffman’s family history in Aurora, Mary Thurston is a good resource.

Shortly after Thurston and her family moved to Aurora’s Chambers Heights neighborhood in the mid-1960s, they became close with the Coffman family, who lived a half a block away on the corner of 11th Avenue and Granby Street.

“We were both new families to the neighborhood, and we just connected,” said the 86-year-old Thurston.

Young Coloradans toggle between economy, social issues in election

Jabari Smith, organizer with Obama for America in Denver, center, Brian Winstanley, 17, left, and Andrew Schwartz, 16, of East High School check the map for canvassing in Five Points. (Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post)
Jabari Smith, organizer with Obama for America in Denver, center, Brian Winstanley, 17, left, and Andrew Schwartz, 16, of East High School check the map for canvassing in Five Points. (Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post)

For first-time voter Tyler Antikainen, a politically in-tune 19-year-old sophomore at Metropolitan State University of Denver, both presidential candidates offer qualities he describes as essential in leading the country.

To bolster an anemic U.S. economy, he believes Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney’s business background is an asset. On social issues — particularly support of same-sex marriage — he’s in lock step with President Barack Obama.

“So my feeling is: Do I vote for who might be best for the country economically, or for who I agree with and is open-minded socially? I don’t know,” Antikainen said on a recent afternoon before attending his course on leadership and social change.

Obama talks of rebuilding middle class at Colorado College

President Barack Obama shakes hands with supporters after his arrival at Peterson Air Force Base in Colorado Springs, Colo., Thursday, Aug. 9, 2012. (AP | Chris Schneider)
President Barack Obama shakes hands with supporters after his arrival at Peterson Air Force Base in Colorado Springs, Colo., Thursday, Aug. 9, 2012. (AP | Chris Schneider)

COLORADO SPRINGS — President Barack Obama relayed a message to the middle-class Thursday afternoon on a grassy quad at Colorado College, often times interrupted by chants of “Four more years! Four more years!” from the thousands in attendance.

“This election is a choice between two fundamentally different visions for how we move this country forward,” said Obama to a crowd of about 4,200 gathered outside in temperatures in the mid-90s. “The direction you choose in November is going to affect not only us, but our kids and grand kids for decades to come.”

Western states’ large Mormon population may give momentum to Romney

Nevada state Sen. Joe Hardy said, "There's a common belief in the Mormon Church that we should vote and be engaged in the process of government." (David Becker, Special to The Denver Post)
Nevada state Sen. Joe Hardy said, “There’s a common belief in the Mormon Church that we should vote and be engaged in the process of government.” (David Becker, Special to The Denver Post)

LAS VEGAS — It’s a hindrance in other parts of the country, but front-runner Mitt Romney’s Mormon faith is now likely to extend his momentum as the Republican presidential nomination contest enters a region that’s proved fruitful to him in the past.

With electability a focal point among GOP voters, Romney is well-equipped to gain further traction in his message of being the candidate best fit to challenge President Barack Obama, due in part to the fact he’ll receive far-reaching support from voters like state Sen. Joe Hardy and Heidi Wixom, a reading teacher, in Saturday’s Nevada caucuses.

“There’s a common belief in the Mormon Church that we should vote and be engaged in the process of government,” said Hardy, who is among nine Mormons to serve in the Nevada Legislature.

Obama’s return to Colorado on Tuesday shows state’s importance

President Barack Obama touts his American Jobs Act in a speech Sept. 27 at Abraham Lincoln High School in Denver. (Joe Amon, The Denver Post)
President Barack Obama touts his American Jobs Act in a speech Sept. 27 at Abraham Lincoln High School in Denver. (Joe Amon, The Denver Post)

Exactly four weeks since his last visit to Colorado, President Barack Obama returns on a two-day stop, reaffirming the political importance of the state for the 2012 election.

Shortly after his arrival this evening, Obama is scheduled to attend a pair of private high-dollar fundraisers at the Pepsi Center, where guests will donate a minimum of $250, and a maximum of $35,800 to participate.

Benefits from the fundraisers go toward the Obama Victory Fund, a joint fundraising committee that supports the president’s re-election campaign and the Democratic National Committee.

President Obama pitches his unemployment plan in Colorado

Clockwise from top left: Ray Dalke; Liz Swiech; Clara Simmons; and Mike Swiech. (Craig F. Walker, The Denver Post)
Clockwise from top left: Ray Dalke; Liz Swiech; Clara Simmons; and Mike Swiech. (Craig F. Walker, The Denver Post)

Often overshadowed by what seems like constant rhetoric from politicians, critics and economists about job creation and the economic instability of the country are the stories of common individuals who are unable to find work.

Here in Colorado, the unemployment rate is 8.5 percent.

Between July and August, the state failed to create any jobs. Instead, it lost 1,800.

Today, President Barack Obama returns to Colorado for the first time in more than a year to promote the American Jobs Act, a plan he presented to a gridlocked Congress this month.